Album Review – Roscoe Mitchell and Mike Reed – The Ritual and the Dance

As it opens with supple interplay between swirling soprano saxophone, droning bells and subtle percussion, the newest release by Saxophonist Roscoe Mitchell and drummer Mike Reed, The Ritual and the Dance, is a testament to Mitchell’s rich musical language which has been slowly built through collaborations like this one for over 50 years. Roscoe Mitchell has always

Review: Tim Berne and Matt Mitchell – Spiders

One of the things I’ve always admired about alto saxophonist Tim Berne is his ability to always seem ahead of the curve. I remember first checking out his early discography, hearing compositions that resembled things I may have heard from a group at I-Beam the night before, then checking the liner notes and realizing that

Review: Andrew Smiley – Looming as Light Torn

Guitarist Andrew Smiley’s new solo album, Looming as Light Torn, was recorded in 2019, but don’t let that stop you from hearing it as a quarantine record. Like a guitarist working on tunes alone in his practice space while waiting for his bandmates to arrive, the album’s two long tracks sound lonely but also excited

Review: Soojin Suh’s Colorist Trio – Colorist

Colorist is the newest project from Korean drummer Soojin Suh, one of the most prominent faces on the jazz scene in Seoul, Korea. The album feels like an early zenith in the arc of Soojin’s career, until one realizes that this is only her third album with decades of music ahead of her. As one

New Label Review: Mung Music (Korea)

Mung Music is an innovative new Korean record label based in Seoul with a unique perspective. The rough translation of “Mung” alone gives listeners an idea as to the sounds coming out of their label— the expression: “spacing out”, or entering the space between the conscious and subconscious. To fully appreciate Sunjae Lee’s relatively new

Review: Patricia Brennan – Maquishti

It gives me great pleasure listening to any vibraphonist and marimbist, and though I’ve written about them a few times in my career, I feel that the quality of what I am learning in this new digital age is only getting stronger in terms of searching out new and rarely spoken about musicians. As someone

Year in Review: 2020 Unplug

More than likely it’ll be January of 2021 by the time you read this. And while all of us have struggled to find ways to cope with the virus, loss of work, countless deaths, being stuck at home, breathing through masks, continued racial and gender-based violence, and the general feeling of impending doom, it must

Review: Angel Bat Dawid LIVE

South African artist and academic, Selby Mvusi, reflecting on the performance of sub-Saharan Africa bushmen, argued that there is a degree of precision inherent to natural vision and perception is something that can be learned. Put differently, our visualisation can be trained and by extension here, our visual sense in so far as it relates to sound can be precisioned. If sound is understood as a concrete visual sense, then we can begin to think infinitely about what we hear

Review: The Wretched

Through the broader lens of sounds coming out of South Africa, the Wretched sit at the periphery. But when listening to the rage emanating through their debut album, they’re situated right at the centre of the chaos and contradiction of daily life in the country. The album captures the feeling of a generation dealing with

Interview: Saxophonist Sarah Hughes

I recently had the opportunity to talk with saxophonist Sarah Hughes. Having released her second record as a leader, The Drag, in late 2019, she continues to experiment and explore new areas of her sound. This interview focuses on her creative process, her approach to experimentation, and where Ms. Hughes intends to go next. Cisco